S.S. Cox Show Case Company, North Manchester

The S.S. Cox Showcase Factory Under Construction in 1911 (site of Warner Brooder)

Cox Show Case Factory (under construction), North Manchester


Source: North Manchester News, January 20, 1916

SHOW CASE COMPANY IS REORGANIZED

There was a reorganization of the S.S. Cox Show Case company Monday, a considerable amount of the stock changing hands prior to the reorganization. By this change of stock, S.S. Cox and Fred Gleason disposed of their stock, A.I. Urschel, J.L. Ulrey, Joe Wetzel, H.I. Hays, and W.S. Shaffer coming into the company. The directors were elected as follows, A.I. Urschel, J.L. Ulrey, Joe Wetzel, H.I. Hays, Cecil Shefley, W.S. Shaffer, J.A. Browne, Paul Browne and Dr. George G. Shoemaker. This board was organized by electing J.A. Browne as president.

The office management will be changed by Joe Wetzel coming from the office of the Syracuse factory to take charge of it. There will also be a change to some extent in the character of the output, or rather an addition line will be added. W.S. Shaffer, who comes here from Kendallville, is a show case manufacturer of years of experience, and the company under his direction is preparing to manufacture a line of small cases, both of glass and wood. A specialty will be made of glass cases to be sold to jobbers who will furnish them to the dealers along with assortments of goods. The company has contracts for making cases of this character for the United Drug Company for their Rexall lines, and for some other large users of cases.

At present members of the company report that the year is opening with good prospects. In the old line there are many orders, the management saying that at the present time there is more than $25,000 worth of work in the factory. Of this amount there is an order for a complete outfit of store fixtures for the Seybold dry goods company at Logansport to cost when completed something over ten thousand dollars.

A large amount of new machinery is being added for handling plate glass in making it into small cases. Large grinding wheels, and polishing machines being in the list.