Mill Stones at MCFH

 

North Manchester Historical Society Press Release, June 2016

OLD MILL STONES ON EXHIBIT AT THE NORTH MANCHESTER CENTER FOR HISTORY

 

 

 

Dakota Layne, Mark Ryner, Russell Shively and Arnold McQuinn of Wendt Crane and Rigging, Wabash, helped move two mid-1800’s grist mill stones to be displayed at the North Manchester Center for History.  The stones came from Harter Mill, built in 1843, and are estimated to weight over 1,000 pounds each.


 

 

 

 

Dakota Layne, Mark Ryner, Russell Shively and Arnold McQuinn of Wendt Crane and Rigging, Wabash, helped move two mid-1800’s grist mill stones to be displayed at the North Manchester Center for History.  The stones came from Harter Mill, built in 1843, and are estimated to weight over 1,000 pounds each.  Exhibit Designer Jeanne Andersen gives the crew two thumbs up for a hard job well done.


 

 

 

Arnold McQuinn, Mark Ryner, Russell Shively and Dakota Layne of Wendt Crane and Rigging, Wabash, position a mid-1800’s grist mill stone for a North Manchester Center for History exhibit on early settlers. 



 

 

 

Russell Shively, Dakota Layne, Mark Ryner, and Arnold McQuinn of Wendt Crane and Rigging, Wabash, position a mid-1800’s grist mill stone for a North Manchester Center for History exhibit on early settlers. 


 

 

 

Wendt Crane and Rigging employees Russell Shively (front), Arnold McQuinn and Mark Ryner, hoist a 1,000+ lb. grist mill stone to be displayed at the North Manchester Center for History.  Not pictured is crew member Dakota Layne.


 

The two grinding stones come from the grist mill built by Joseph Harter, Sr. in 1843, less than ten years after North Manchester was founded.  Grist mills were used to grind wheat into flour.  The stones are estimated to weigh over 1,000 pounds each.  The North Manchester Center for History is very grateful for the assistance given by Wendt in moving these hard-to-handle artifacts.

 

The North Manchester Center for History tells the story of the history of the Eel River Valley.  In the past year, about one-third of its exhibits have been updated.  In particular, the areas presenting North Manchester’s prehistoric past and early settlers are being completely redesigned.

 

The Center is open weekdays from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  Its collection includes over 28,000 documents, photographs and three-dimensional artifacts.  The museum at 122 E. Main Street is open although access to it is somewhat limited by construction work that is restoring its façade to its 1925 appearance.